Matt Forney
Spread the Word!

Why I Deleted My YouTube Videos

deleted

If you’ve bothered to notice, I’ve removed all the videos I’ve recorded from my YouTube account. Don’t worry, it wasn’t because I was censored by feminists or something, it was for personal reasons.

1. I don’t benefit enough from recording them to make them worth it.

Because I don’t live alone, I have to wait until everyone is either gone or asleep before I can record. Additionally, since the lighting in my home is so piss-poor, I have to take my laptop into another room and set up there so I don’t look like some creeper. Combine this with the effort of actually recording the video, editing it, and uploading it, and my motivation goes straight out the window.

2. Unlike blogs, videos have diminishing returns.

The thing I like about blogs and books is that you can read them at your own pace, whenever you like. I’m a speed-reader, so I can digest a lot of articles and blog posts in a very short amount of time. With a video or podcast, you’re stuck listening to/watching it at the performer’s pace.

This means that becoming a successful YouTube personality is much more difficult than becoming a successful blogger.

For example, if I write a 1,000 word blog post, some people will be able to read it in ten minutes, others in twenty, a few in maybe five. But if I record a ten-minute video, no one in the world will be able to finish watching it in less than ten minutes. Because most people have lives, this means the number of videos they can watch on a regular basis is smaller than the number of blog posts they can read.

In other words, they’re going to focus on the highest-quality YouTube personalities.

Talking to a camera is not my forte, writing is. There are guys like Davis Aurini and Aaron Clarey who are fantastic YouTube hosts, and while I could potentially rise to their level with enough practice, is it worth neglecting my strengths in order to do? I’d rather focus on one or two things and master them then be a jack-of-all-trades, mainly because mastering something usually allows you to draw a profit from it.

I might return to videos in the future, but only after I have more free time to practice, and even then more as a once-in-a-while thing than a regular occurrence.

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  • Dave6034

    I can watch and understand a ten-minute lecture in five to seven minutes, depending on how fast the person talking. You sound like a chipmunk that’s been drinking Red Bull, but it’s intelligible. I still prefer to read, though.