Matt Forney
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The 100th Anniversary of Polish Independence in Warsaw Was a Nationalist Triumph

It was a week wracked with more drama than a high school glee club. With just a few days before Warsaw’s annually scheduled march commemorating Polish Independence Day—this march commemorating 100 years of Poland’s independence from the German, Austrian, and Russian empires—leftist mayor and spiritual lesbian Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz banned the event, citing its “aggressive nationalism.”

In response, the Polish government announced their own march, taking place along the route that the banned march would take. Then, 24 hours later, the nationalist groups holding the banned march had the ban overturned by the courts. The government and the nationalists made a compromise: the marches would be merged, with the government group in front and the nationalists in back.

I joined in on the march this past Sunday (thanks to the support of my readers) and it was a beautiful experience. Contrary to the fake news media’s reports of the march being dominated by the “far-right” (whatever that means) and “neo-Nazis” (laughable to anyone who knows Polish history), the hundreds of thousands of people who filled the streets of Warsaw that day were normal Poles: families, couples, grandparents. There were a number of foreign nationalists, but the march as a whole was invigorating, inspiring, and optical.

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My mission began on 2pm at the Centrum metro station in downtown Warsaw, where the march was scheduled to begin. Located in the center of the city, the block houses several of Warsaw’s most notable landmarks, including the Pałac Kultury i Nauki (Palace of Culture and Science) and the Warszawa Centralna and Warszawa Śródmieście railway stations. The weather was bad, as it usually is in Poland: it had been overcast and rainy all weekend, and the city was smeared in an dreary fog. I think I’ve only ever seen the sun shine in Warsaw once.

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As expected, the block was packed. I walked down to the march from where I had been staying, crossing paths with a foot race taking place a few blocks northwest, and I saw revelers all over the place, easily identified by their Polish flags. There were numerous vendors hocking flags and other memorabilia; I considered buying some, but opted against it because I needed my hands free in order to film the march (and because I already had a Polish flag at home).

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I was situated on Rondo Dmowskiego, right over the Centrum metro station. From there, the march would proceed eastward along Aleje Jerozolimskie, crossing the Vistula River and ending at the PGE Narodowy stadium. Around me was a sea of Polish flags wielded by an army of Polish families. I did run into some Dutch nationalists near the edge of the rondo (I had met up with them a couple of days before), but aside from them, I was the only foreigner around. Around me, people sang songs and cheered as a number of patriotic Polish tunes were belted out of strategically placed loudspeakers.

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The march was late in starting, but it began with Polish President Andrzej Duda leading the crowd in the national anthem. Not long after, we began tromping in earnest, the Poles chanting slogans and singing songs while young men lit red flares to illuminate the way (the sun sets around 3:30 in the afternoon this far north in November). Despite the wideness of the street—Warsaw, unlike most European cities, has streets built to accommodate modern vehicles—I was cramped and crammed in with the crowd for much of the first hour due to the sheer number of people participating. This, combined with the constant flare-lighting, gave the march a triumphant atmosphere, like a conquering army come to take back what belongs to it.

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As we made our way down Aleje Jerozolimskie, the sea of Polish flags began to give way to other insignias and flyers. Most were equally innocuous, with frescoes of Mary and Catholic crosses abounding, but a few advertised various nationalist groups and slogans. The Dutch nationalists had unveiled a sign that I couldn’t understand but which had a word that seemed to look like the Dutch equivalent of “new world order.” I also noticed some more foreign flags around this time, including Swedish flags, Finnish flags, Estonian flags, and even a British flag.

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Nearing the Vistula, the crowd seemed to thin out a bit, either because the street was finally wide enough to accommodate everyone or some less-dedicated marchers decided to go home. I filmed most of this portion of the march with my phone and only stopped because I ran out of hard drive space, and you can view my footage below:

The march crossed the Vistula and began to peter out, with the more serious participants stepping over to a stage that had been set up outside PGE Narodowy, where several people were giving speeches. Around this time, many people—including myself—opted to go home due to the main event being over. I opted to take one of the suburban trains back to Warszawa Śródmieście due to the metro being overrun with people: lines for the ticket machines were insanely long. Even still, I ended up waiting in line for close to 30 minutes before I was able to get a ticket…for a train ride that lasted five minutes.

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The march itself was exhilarating and intense, a celebration of Polish independence and defiance in the face of the European Union and globalism, an experience shared by the foreigners who came to celebrate with the Poles. The Polish government did yeoman’s work in creating a memorable experience that would be impossible for the fake news media to smear as a “far-right march,” not that that kept them from trying. Few leftists dared to show their faces at the event; a group of antifa who tried to disrupt the march were quickly curbstomped by the police.

The Polish government also shut down a conference that weekend being held by a retarded neo-Nazi (literally) group, arresting many of its members and also turning away foreign conference attendees at the border. One conference speaker who slipped through their grasp was Counter-Currents’ Greg Johnson, who spent the weekend simultaneously slapping his Swiss rentboy around their hotel room and shitting bricks over potentially being deported. If you heard about foreign nationalists being denied entry to Poland last weekend, it’s because they were affiliated with these idiots.

I had a good time in Warsaw, meeting up with friends and newcomers alike, Polish and non-Polish, as we came together for this momentous occasion. I did have one brief altercation in a bar on Saturday night, when a random Pole came up to me in a bar, asked me if I was “Matt Forney,” accused me of “writing a book about sleeping with Filipina prostitutes,” then told me to “fuck off” because “we are radical traditionalists here.” No idea what a “radical traditionalist” was doing trying to pick up girls in a bar where people were grinding on each other on the dance floor, but what do I know?

Having said all that, I see worrying storm clouds on the horizon for Poland. I’ve only been to Warsaw once—a year ago—but compared to that visit, Poland appears to be Americanizing at a far more rapid rate than anywhere in Eastern Europe. In Warsaw, I saw a shocking number of women who were fat, tattooed, pierced, had cotton candy-colored hair, or some combination of all four. Smartphone addiction is also evident. Browsing Tinder was like being back in Chicago, right down to Polish girls making statements like “I’m waging war on boredom.” The first match I got on Tinder was with a Ukrainian girl, though we unfortunately couldn’t meet up.

Much of this seems to stem from the fact that Poles are the most pro-American people in Europe and are in love with everything Uncle Sam. For example, after I returned to Warszawa Centralna, the McDonald’s at the station was absolutely packed. I’m told that Warsaw’s leftism is not representative of Poland as a whole—after all, they did elect a spiritual lesbian as their mayor—but after seeing the distinctions between urbanites and hicks gradually vanish in the U.S. over the years, I’m not optimistic.

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I might write more about my experiences in Poland later—not just in Warsaw, but Kraków, Poznań, and Przemyśl—but for now, at least, the flame of nationalism is safe there. Poland is holding parliamentary elections next year, with the ruling Law and Justice party expected to win a second term against the leftist Civic Platform (of whom Warsaw mayor Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz is a member), and I hope to be able to see that triumph as well.

Read Next: Coverage of Poland’s 100th Independence Anniversary is Coming Soon